(i) TERI’s report provided satellite images of land patches where forest cover existed before 2005 but was flattened later.

 

TERI report reveals an increasing tendency at the village-level to claim as much forestland as possible. This will lead in more deforestation, exploitation of water, desertification, lack of carbon sequestration and further vulnerability to climate change.

 

(ii) When governments do not recognize or enforce community forest rights, communities are often powerless to keep external forces such as unscrupulous actors in the timber and oil industries or illegal settlers from destroying forests.

 

(iii) Since there is no cut off date for the receipt of new claims and gram sabhas are empowered

to extend the 90-day window for such pleas, this process has become a never ending one.

 

(iv) The Forest Survey of India’s (FSI) State of the Forest Report has documented that 67,900 ha of forest cover has been lost in 188 tribal districts between 2009 and 2011, mainly due to encroachments.

 

(v) The Forest Department continues to be seen as an obstacle, despite attempts to limit its role in the implementation.

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